Editor’s Letter 6/20/2016

HERpothesis is looking for a social media assistant!

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Image credit: Summer solstice 2013, taken by Adriana Ortiz

Hi all!

I hope this finds you doing well and enjoying the fabulous coincidence of a strawberry moon and a summer solstice tonight!

To continue with the flavor of tonight’s moon, I’ve got a sweet little HERpothesis update for you. Here’s the deal: I’m looking for a social media assistant for HERpothesis. Right now HERpothesis’s editorial/administrative/social media teams consist of, well, just me. And I would love some help with our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram pages. This would include finding relevant pages to follow and connect with on each platform, pitching ways to expand our social media content, and keeping an eye out for awesome ladies in STEAM that might make great HERpothesis contributors. The commitment would be a few hours total per week, ideally split up into a little bit of work each day. This position would be great for someone in high school or a college underclassman, with an interest in media and/or STEAM fields. If this sounds like something you might be interested in, shoot me an email at herpothesis@gmail.com. Be sure to include a little bit about yourself, why you’re interested, and ask any questions you may have about the position, HERpothesis, me, who Rey’s parents are, the meaning of life, etc. (I can’t guarantee to know the answer to the meaning of life but I can provide you with plentiful theories about Rey’s lineage.)

Beyond that, keep an eye out for our upcoming HERpothesis Golden Record project, to be released in time for aliens to find it before they invade Earth, hopefully.

Have a great night, and be sure to watch the sunset.

Best,

Alex Hanson

Cracking Code, and Subsequently, Life Itself

Learning JavaScript is stretching my brain and teaching me some awesome life lessons.

By Julia Arciga

Art by Charlotte Southall

Once upon a time, I wanted to be a chemist. Then I found out I was really, really bad at all things STEM.

No, it’s completely true. I scraped through pre-calc on some kind of miracle. Physics was so intriguing to me, but I would always get those pesky equations wrong—no matter how hard I tried. But my apparent non-affinity for all things science never really stopped me from trying: I once enrolled in a free open course from Yale on Quantum Physics (bad idea, in hindsight). I was a part of my high school’s Science Olympiad club, and got 7th place in competition. I was never a scientific success, but I was just so happy to be surrounded by things that I knew nothing about that I didn’t really care if I embarrassed myself.

I got my start in coding in a completely unusual way: through supermodel Karlie Kloss.

Once upon a time, I also wanted to be a professional model (also a bad idea for me, in hindsight). Karlie Kloss was one of my idols—and she’s still such a muse of mine to this day, although my supermodel dreams are far behind me. I caught wind that she was picking up coding, and I thought that was super interesting: some glamorous fashion goddess was flaunting her geeky side. Mix that with companies like Google and Snapchat moving into my neighborhood of Venice Beach and my dad working on code around the house, and it wasn’t long before I decided to sign up for Codecademyjust to give it a shot. Continue reading “Cracking Code, and Subsequently, Life Itself”

Batten Down the Hatches: The Rise of the Cephalopod

Tell us your secrets, you squirmy inkfish!

By Shelby Traynor

Illustration by Alex Hanson

Off the coast of Norway and Greenland lies the memory of the hopefully-fictional Kraken, a Giant Squid capable of snapping a galleon sailing ship in two. The storybook sea monster takes up the ocean, its tentacles reaching for unassuming sailors and its heart set on destruction. If the Kraken had been real—if it had existed today, alongside its brethren of very-real Giant Squid—eager scientists would call it a cephalopod.

The oceans are a cephalopod’s stomping ground—squid, octopus, and cuttlefish can be found in the waters of the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Southern, and Arctic oceans. They’re feisty and adaptable, adorable and terrifying, and according to a study published last week in Current Biology, our squishy, tentacled friends are thriving. Continue reading “Batten Down the Hatches: The Rise of the Cephalopod”