Astrophysics, Fashion, and DJ Carly Sagan: An Interview with Emily Rice

People get worried about being on this direct path, especially for something that’s perceived as competitive, like science or academia, but really there’s a lot of people that took a more winding path or forged their own way.

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Interview by Alex Hanson

Emily Rice is an astrophysicist, assistant professor at City University of New York, research associate at the American Museum of Natural History, co-founder at the astronomy-meets-fashion blog STARtorialist, host of Astronomy on Tap in New York City, parody video creator, and overall kickass lady. She is a master of combining the expressive and the scientific, and her projects contribute to a sense of community within astronomy, as well as showing the general public that science can be fun and creative. I got to interview Emily over Google Hangout about her work, STARtorialist, and her DJ alter ego. Continue reading “Astrophysics, Fashion, and DJ Carly Sagan: An Interview with Emily Rice”

To Be Science or Not To Be Science

What exactly is science?

by Melody Xu 

Cartoons by Alex Hanson

What exactly is science? What, if anything, makes it different from the humanities? There is no definitive answer to these questions. For the sake of discussion, however, let’s draw the line between science, which I’ll define as having the goal of discovering the true nature of the world, and other academic fields. I’ll recognize three different distinctions between science and other academic fields: the role of empiricism, the role of mathematics, and, finally, the role of peer review. Continue reading “To Be Science or Not To Be Science”

The Python in Film School

The way a programmer thinks is not so different from the way someone in the film industry thinks.

by Tessa Keough

Illustration by Alex Hanson

Few people would expect a film student to add a course in Computer Science to their schedule. However, since my university’s individualized program allows me to focus in film and explore other subjects, I was able to do so. From a pure “I need a job when I graduate” perspective, I took the class in order to add software development to my list of skills, knowing that this would make me more marketable, contemporaneous, and would distinguish me from others in the film industry. There are few professions that do not require interacting with a computer in some way. With technology advancing daily, it is becoming more and more important to the electronics we use, and how to manipulate them to our advantage. Computer science is essential for this. Continue reading “The Python in Film School”