Out of This World

Spacey illustrations by Sonja Katanic.

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Illustrations and Captions by Sonja Katanic

Couch Surfing

When you finally feel at home somewhere, your new habitat, and it’s just in time for you leave. The feeling of floating there, suspended in this state, this longing to stay forever is unbearable.

day-13

Space Girl

This is a piece of art I did that is completely different to any self-portraits I’ve ever done. It is not who I am, nor who I will be. It is my ideal, who I wish I could be. Unshackled of any earthly responsibilities, the epitome of calmness and serenity, and most importantly, anxiety-free. She is a character I think about a lot, and one I even created a constellation in the sky for.

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Find more of Sonja’s art on her Instagram page @spicy_astro_babe.

Technoscience and Scallops: Actor-Network Theory (ANT)

As a framework and approach to social theory and research, A.N.T. is centered around science and technology, but is by no means limited to it.

By Melody Xu

Illustration by Charlotte Southall

The traditional view of science and technology holds that what the two different fields hope to achieve are in stark contrast: Galileo “discovered” the phases of Venus, but these phases existed prior to his “discovery.” Diesel “invented” the diesel engine, which did not exist before his invention. However, the foundation of actor-network theory (A.N.T.) stands on the claim of technoscience, which claims that science and technology share the same type of processes rather than having inherently different methods. In this sense, then, what would be perceived as a discovery (science) or an invention (technology) are constructed by the same type of processes. Both can be mapped out by actor-networks. As a framework and approach to social theory and research, A.N.T. is centered around science and technology, but is by no means limited to it. Continue reading “Technoscience and Scallops: Actor-Network Theory (ANT)”

Cracking Code, and Subsequently, Life Itself

Learning JavaScript is stretching my brain and teaching me some awesome life lessons.

By Julia Arciga

Art by Charlotte Southall

Once upon a time, I wanted to be a chemist. Then I found out I was really, really bad at all things STEM.

No, it’s completely true. I scraped through pre-calc on some kind of miracle. Physics was so intriguing to me, but I would always get those pesky equations wrong—no matter how hard I tried. But my apparent non-affinity for all things science never really stopped me from trying: I once enrolled in a free open course from Yale on Quantum Physics (bad idea, in hindsight). I was a part of my high school’s Science Olympiad club, and got 7th place in competition. I was never a scientific success, but I was just so happy to be surrounded by things that I knew nothing about that I didn’t really care if I embarrassed myself.

I got my start in coding in a completely unusual way: through supermodel Karlie Kloss.

Once upon a time, I also wanted to be a professional model (also a bad idea for me, in hindsight). Karlie Kloss was one of my idols—and she’s still such a muse of mine to this day, although my supermodel dreams are far behind me. I caught wind that she was picking up coding, and I thought that was super interesting: some glamorous fashion goddess was flaunting her geeky side. Mix that with companies like Google and Snapchat moving into my neighborhood of Venice Beach and my dad working on code around the house, and it wasn’t long before I decided to sign up for Codecademyjust to give it a shot. Continue reading “Cracking Code, and Subsequently, Life Itself”

Fearless Pioneers: An Interview with Rachel Ignotofsky

My passion for learning about biology and the mechanics of how the world works did not leave me when I decided to go to art school.

by Adriana Ortiz

All art courtesy of Rachel Ignotofsky’s website

Rachel Ignotofsky is an illustrator and author hailing from Kansas City, Missouri. She works as a freelance designer nowadays, but has previously worked at the iconic Hallmark card company and wonderfully dispels any dreariness that (500) Days of Summer may have implied about it. Rachel is passionate about science and history and communicating all of it toward a wider audience to inspire learning in others. Her work takes complex information and makes it accessible and fun, and does it all with an adorably appealing aesthetic. She covers topics ranging from marine animals to bodily organs and basically any interesting idea imaginable. I am a huge fan that is IN LOVE with her Instagram account, as it brings so much joy and knowledge to my feed. I totally recommend giving it a follow if you love cute things combined with science!

Rachel has recently written and published a book called Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World which showcases various women in science throughout history. She tells the often under-recognized, yet super-inspiring stories of incredibly intelligent and accomplished women in STEM, each accompanied by her illustrations. It comes out July 26 of this year!

I am so glad to have interviewed Rachel about her new book and everything behind it, so read on to learn more about this STEAM queen and everything she loves. Continue reading “Fearless Pioneers: An Interview with Rachel Ignotofsky”